FALL 2021 COURSES

The following courses are offered Fall 2021 in Fine Arts and Digital Media. Advisors are ready to assist you with choosing the most appropriate class for you. If you have specific questions about course content, please contact Sarah Stolar, Department Chair - sstolar@unm.edu, or the instructor for the course directly. Faculty bios and emails can be found here.

Contact an advisor directly at (575) 737-3698 or click HERE to register.

Under certain circumstances, prerequisites may be waived. You must contact an advisor directly to facilitate this request.

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FALL 2021

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

The 2021 Fall session runs August 23rd through September 18th

Art Practices I - ARTS 1220

w/ Sarah Stolar

Live with reduced enrollment - Fridays, 12:30-5pm

This course introduces the exploration of processes, ideas, and diverse media of visual arts. It addresses the thematic concepts that are central to the nature of art making today, with emphasis given to issues of LIGHT, FRAME, and MARK while developing an understanding of the elements and principles of design.

Art Practices I is an interdisciplinary foundations course exploring the diverse processes, ideas, and materials of visual art. Students will work from a variety of approaches including (but not limited to) drawing, painting, sculpture, 2-D design, digital, and time-based media. They will address thematic concepts that are central to the nature of art today while also learning hands-on technical skills, craft, and presentation of finished artworks. Focusing on three distinct topics – Light, Frame, and Mark – students will engage in visual and conceptual problem solving, collaboration, and personal exploration of individual practice. Readings, writings, slide lectures, and videos on relevant artists and periods in art history will be assigned and presented throughout the semester in conjunction with each project.

Drawing I - ARTS 1610-800

w/ Sarah Stolar

Online with synchronous Zoom hours - Wednesdays, 3-5pm

Drawing I introduces the basic principles, materials, and skills of observational drawing. Emphasis is placed on rendering a 3-D subject on a 2-D surface with visual accuracy. Other topics include historical and contemporary references as well as an investigation of linear perspective, line, value, shape, space & composition. 

This course is a survey of the basic techniques, materials, theory, vocabulary, and overall practice of observational drawing. Because abstraction is an exaggeration or alteration of reality, it is important to first learn to draw from life; therefore, the projects will be interpreted from a variety of natural forms including interior/exterior space, still-life, self-portrait, the skeleton, and an artist copy. These drawings will be executed using a variety of traditional drawing materials such as charcoal, pastel, Conté, pencil, and ink. With these materials, students will develop an understanding of technical variety in mark-making using perspective, proportion, scale, volume, texture, contrast, value, line and shade. Toward the end of the semester, students will be introduced to color and collage and create more experimental works on paper. Each session will be devoted to studio work with some art historical discussion and/or critique. 

Drawing I - ARTS 1610-801

w/ Gary Cook

Live with reduced enrollment - Tuesdays, 9am-2:30pm

Drawing I introduces the basic principles, materials, and skills of observational drawing. Emphasis is placed on rendering a 3-D subject on a 2-D surface with visual accuracy. Other topics include historical and contemporary references as well as an investigation of linear perspective, line, value, shape, space & composition. 

This course is a survey of the basic techniques, materials, theory, vocabulary, and overall practice of observational drawing. Because abstraction is an exaggeration or alteration of reality, it is important to first learn to draw from life; therefore, the projects will be interpreted from a variety of natural forms including interior/exterior space, still-life, self-portrait, the skeleton, and an artist copy. These drawings will be executed using a variety of traditional drawing materials such as charcoal, pastel, Conté, pencil, and ink. With these materials, students will develop an understanding of technical variety in mark-making using perspective, proportion, scale, volume, texture, contrast, value, line and shade. Toward the end of the semester, students will be introduced to color and collage and create more experimental works on paper. Each session will be devoted to studio work with some art historical discussion and/or critique. 

Painting I - ARTS 1630

w/ Sarah Stolar

Live with reduced enrollment - Mondays, 12-5:30pm

Painting I introduces the tradition of painting as a medium for artistic expression. Students will investigate materials, tools, techniques, history and concepts of painting. Emphasis is placed on developing descriptive and perceptual skills, color theory, and composition.  

This course introduces basic concepts and develops technical and perceptual skills using acrylic or oil (preferred). Students will learn the fundamentals of observational oil painting, focusing on representational paintings of a variety of subjects including still-life, landscape, and self-portrait. We will discuss the visual information in painting, the dialogue surrounding painting and its formulas, and when it is appropriate to abandon those formulas. Students will make several short-session paintings throughout the semester, rather than focusing on one or two highly polished works, and learn of a variety of techniques accumulating in a confident, contemporary painting style.​

Painting II - ARTS 2630

w/ Gary Cook

Live with reduced enrollment - Thursdays, 9am-2:30pm

Prerequisite: ARTS 1630

This course focuses on the expressive and conceptual aspects of painting, building on the observational, compositional, technical, and critical skills gained previously. Students will investigate a variety of approaches to subject matter, materials, and creative processes through in-class projects, related out-of-class assignments, library research or museum/gallery attendance, written responses, and critiques. 

Painting II continues exploration of the painting concepts and techniques presented in Painting I. Working from imagination as well as observation, emphasizing the expressive potential of the medium. Course objectives include increasing ones visual vocabulary, seeing skills, and resolving visual images in the form of paintings. Noting that this is not an introduction class, the primary goal of the class is to further develop ones understanding of visual phenomena, surface development and composition as expressive tools. Assignments will be executed in medium to large scale painting formats. This course explores ideas on creativity and consciousness as they relates to knowing and conceptualizing ideas.

Intro to Photography - ARTS 1410

w/ Teena Lee Ryan

Online, asynchronous 

This course introduces the making of photographic images from a broad viewpoint to consider both as an art practice and as a cultural practice. The course covers technical information on camera use and functionality, composition and visual design, digital workflow and editing, professional functions of manipulating and enhancing images, and printing correctly and effectively.

 

The historical aspects of photography are also covered along with a range of contemporary practices. This is a digital course, but if time allows, I will include some darkroom instruction. Class time is a combination of technical demonstrations, lab time, class critiques, discussions of readings pertaining to photography, and slide presentations, with the possibility of a field trip. 

Intro to Ceramics - ARTS 1310

w/ Lee Akins

Live with reduced enrollment - Tuesdays, 9-2:30pm

This course introduces the technical processes and conceptual concerns of working with ceramic material. Various methods of forming functional and expressive works out of clay are explored. Methods used include hand building and throwing, basic clay bodies, slip and glaze, and atmospheric firing.

Terminology, concepts, historical and technical information will be presented. Techniques will include the hand building techniques of pinch, coil, slab and molding. Wheel projects will include cylinders, bowls and mugs. Individual creative development is encouraged. There will be both self-selected and assigned projects.

Ceramics I - ARTS 1320

w/ Lee Akins

Live with reduced enrollment - Thursdays, 9-2:30pm

Prerequisite: ARTS 1310

An introduction to the medium of clay incorporating hand building and wheel throwing to introduce the student to both the sculptural and utilitarian uses of clay. The student will also be introduced to a variety of glazing and firing techniques. 

Continuation of Arts 1310 with an emphasis placed on the mastery of forming, surfacing, and firing processes. Intermediate hand building and wheel throwing techniques will include projects with lids, spouts and decorating. Making and formulating glazes, as well as variety of firing techniques will also be presented. Expanded critical awareness and the development of a personal aesthetic will be encouraged. There will be both self-selected and assigned projects. 

Intro to Printmaking - ARTS 1710

w/ Gary Cook

Live with reduced enrollment - Wednesdays, 9-2:30pm

Prerequisite: ARTS 1610

This course provides direct experience of exploring basic printmaking processes, including relief, intaglio, and monoprint processes, as well as the investigation of materials/media, tools, techniques, history, and concepts of printmaking. Emphasis is given to solving problems through thematic development while producing a portfolio of prints. 

Fundamental techniques in Introduction to Printmaking are presented and practiced in a survey format. Methods and expressive potentials of the major printmaking processes are taught. Instruction includes lecture, demonstrations, practice, and critique. At the conclusion of this course, the student will develop awareness of the unique properties of a wide variety of print processes and the historical development of printmaking and it’s influences on contemporary works; develop technique and the proper use of tools and materials within the print shop as a collaborative working space; Utilize a journal/sketchbook as a documentation process, to develop concepts, generate source material and aid in self-criticism and exploration; increase understanding of his/her own aesthetic aspirations and how these objectives can be expressed using the print media; and create a foundation for more advanced study of print media. 

Shop Foundations - ARTS 1830

w/ Mario Vargus

Live with reduced enrollment - Mondays, 9-11am

This course provides an introduction to the proper use of shop facilities with an emphasis on the safety procedures required for their proper use. The course will provide the student with a foundation of technical skills for use in the production of their work in subsequent classes. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

Intro to Electronic Arts - ARTS 1510

w/ Johanna Case-Hofmeister

Online with synchronous Zoom hours - Tuesdays, 3-5pm

This course will be an introduction to the computer as a medium and fine art tool. The course will explore the history, theory, and contemporary art issues associated with electronic art practice, as well as introduce students to the basic tools and associated technologies. This studio course will introduce simple electronics, software and ideas for working with sound, video, and the Internet to create artwork.

Digital Foundations - FDMA 1210

w/ Peter Walker

Live with reduced enrollment - Wednesdays, 9-11:30pm

This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental working knowledge of the technical, aesthetic, and conceptual aspects of creating digital artwork using a variety of tools in the Adobe Creative Suite.

Introduction to Film and Digital Media - FDMA 1520

w/ Peter Walker

Online with synchronous Zoom hours - Thursdays, 9-11am

This course is designed to provide students with a survey of the histories, innovative concepts, and creative possibilities of digital media. Additionally, students will learn fundamental skills in teamwork, storytelling, and design. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 4: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

 

This course offers a dynamic introduction to the diverse skills required to succeed as a media entrepreneur. Specifically, this course will introduce core Cinematography skills and concepts necessary to work as a professional visual storyteller. This course leads to an Associate’s Degree in Digital Media Arts.

Introduction to Film Studies - FDMA 2210

w/ Kelly Clement

Online, asynchronous 

Analysis of film as a unique art, and a survey of main trends in film history. Screenings and critical study of major films.

 

This course is designed to provide you with a foundation for future film study; to expose you to a wide range of cinematic styles and approaches; and to move you from a passive viewer to an active “reader” of film. You will learn the basic elements of cinematic language (including narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, acting, editing, and sound) and will use that knowledge to analyze the way filmmakers convey information, story, and meaning, develop style, and elicit audience response within a single scene and over the course of an entire feature film. We’ll explore the central critical approaches to the study of cinema, and examine a wide range of film styles and movements. There are no prerequisites for taking this class. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

Video Production II - FDMA 2525-800

w/ Peter Walker

Live with reduced enrollment - Thursdays, 3-5:30

Prerequisite: ARTS 1210

An in-depth exploration of digital video production, including camera, lighting and sound production techniques for studio and field production. This class will help the filmmaker visualize and execute a digital film in a real-world team environment.

Video Production II - FDMA 2525-801

w/ Peter Walker

Online, asynchronous 

Prerequisite: ARTS 1210

An in-depth exploration of digital video production, including camera, lighting and sound production techniques for studio and field production. This class will help the filmmaker visualize and execute a digital film in a real-world team environment.

Introduction to Art - ARTH 1120

w/ Paula King

Online, asynchronous 

In this class, students will be introduced to the nature, vocabulary, media and history of the visual arts, illustrated by examples drawn from many cultures, both Western and non-Western and across many centuries. We will begin with a general overview of the subject, including basic concepts and themes that shed light on the continuity of the artistic enterprise across the span of human experience. We will study the visual elements from which art is made, including how artists use these elements and how the artists' use of visual elements affects our experience of looking at art. We will examine both two-dimensional and three-dimensional media including drawing, painting, printmaking, camera and computer arts, graphic design, sculpture, installation, crafts and architecture. Selected works will be examined in context, including the history of the time and place in which they were created, as well as their function, patronage, and the character and intent of individual artists.

Art History I - ARTH 2110

w/ Paula King

Online, asynchronous 

This survey course explores the art and architecture of ancient pre-historic cultures through the end of the fourteenth century. While focused primarily on the art of the Western civilizations, this course will also provide insights into the works of other major cultures in order to provide alternate views of art and history. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual, and cultural movements that affect and are affected by their creation and development. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.