SPRING 2022 COURSES

The following courses are offered Spring 2022 in Fine Arts and Digital Media. Advisors are ready to assist you with choosing the most appropriate class for you. If you have specific questions about course content, please contact Sarah Stolar, Department Chair - sstolar@unm.edu, or the instructor for the course directly. Faculty bios and emails can be found here.

Contact an advisor directly at (575) 737-3698 or click HERE to register.

Under certain circumstances, prerequisites may be waived. You must contact an advisor directly to facilitate this request.

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SPRING 2022 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

The 2022 Spring session runs January 17th through May 14th
 

Drawing I - ARTS 1610-800
w/ Gary Cook
Live with reduced enrollment - Tuesdays, 9-2:30pm

Drawing I introduces the basic principles, materials, and skills of observational drawing. Emphasis is placed on rendering a 3-D subject on a 2-D surface with visual accuracy. Other topics include historical and contemporary references as well as an investigation of linear perspective, line, value, shape, space & composition. 

This course is a survey of the basic techniques, materials, theory, vocabulary, and overall practice of observational drawing. Because abstraction is an exaggeration or alteration of reality, it is important to first learn to draw from life; therefore, the projects will be interpreted from a variety of natural forms including interior/exterior space, still-life, self-portrait, the skeleton, and an artist copy. These drawings will be executed using a variety of traditional drawing materials such as charcoal, pastel, Conté, pencil, and ink. With these materials, students will develop an understanding of technical variety in mark-making using perspective, proportion, scale, volume, texture, contrast, value, line and shade. Toward the end of the semester, students will be introduced to color and collage and create more experimental works on paper. Each session will be devoted to studio work with some art historical discussion and/or critique. 

Drawing I - ARTS 1610-801
w/ Sarah Stolar
Online with synchronous Zoom hours - Mondays, 3-5pm

Drawing I introduces the basic principles, materials, and skills of observational drawing. Emphasis is placed on rendering a 3-D subject on a 2-D surface with visual accuracy. Other topics include historical and contemporary references as well as an investigation of linear perspective, line, value, shape, space & composition. 

This course is a survey of the basic techniques, materials, theory, vocabulary, and overall practice of observational drawing. Because abstraction is an exaggeration or alteration of reality, it is important to first learn to draw from life; therefore, the projects will be interpreted from a variety of natural forms including interior/exterior space, still-life, self-portrait, the skeleton, and an artist copy. These drawings will be executed using a variety of traditional drawing materials such as charcoal, pastel, Conté, pencil, and ink. With these materials, students will develop an understanding of technical variety in mark-making using perspective, proportion, scale, volume, texture, contrast, value, line and shade. Toward the end of the semester, students will be introduced to color and collage and create more experimental works on paper. Each session will be devoted to studio work with some art historical discussion and/or critique. 

Painting I - ARTS 1630
w/ Sarah Stolar
Live with reduced enrollment - Fridays, 12-5:30pm

Painting I introduces the tradition of painting as a medium for artistic expression. Students will investigate materials, tools, techniques, history and concepts of painting. Emphasis is placed on developing descriptive and perceptual skills, color theory, and composition.  

This course introduces basic concepts and develops technical and perceptual skills using acrylic or oil (preferred). Students will learn the fundamentals of observational oil painting, focusing on representational paintings of a variety of subjects including still-life, landscape, and self-portrait. We will discuss the visual information in painting, the dialogue surrounding painting and its formulas, and when it is appropriate to abandon those formulas. Students will make several short-session paintings throughout the semester, rather than focusing on one or two highly polished works, and learn of a variety of techniques accumulating in a confident, contemporary painting style.​

Painting II - ARTS 2630

w/ Gary Cook

Live with reduced enrollment - Thursdays, 9am-2:30pm

Prerequisite: ARTS 1630

This course focuses on the expressive and conceptual aspects of painting, building on the observational, compositional, technical, and critical skills gained previously. Students will investigate a variety of approaches to subject matter, materials, and creative processes through in-class projects, related out-of-class assignments, library research or museum/gallery attendance, written responses, and critiques. 

Painting II continues exploration of the painting concepts and techniques presented in Painting I. Working from imagination as well as observation, emphasizing the expressive potential of the medium. Course objectives include increasing ones visual vocabulary, seeing skills, and resolving visual images in the form of paintings. Noting that this is not an introduction class, the primary goal of the class is to further develop ones understanding of visual phenomena, surface development and composition as expressive tools. Assignments will be executed in medium to large scale painting formats. This course explores ideas on creativity and consciousness as they relates to knowing and conceptualizing ideas.

Introduction to Ceramics - ARTS 1310
w/ Lee Akins
Live with reduced enrollment
Tuesdays, 9-2:30pm

This course introduces the technical processes and conceptual concerns of working with ceramic material. Various methods of forming functional and expressive works out of clay are explored. Methods used include hand building and throwing, basic clay bodies, slip and glaze, and atmospheric firing.

Terminology, concepts, historical and technical information will be presented. Techniques will include the hand building techniques of pinch, coil, slab and molding. Wheel projects will include cylinders, bowls and mugs. Individual creative development is encouraged. There will be both self-selected and assigned projects.

Ceramics I - ARTS 1320
w/ Lee Akins
Live with reduced enrollment
Thursdays, 9-2:30pm
Prerequisite: ARTS 1310

An introduction to the medium of clay incorporating hand building and wheel throwing to introduce the student to both the sculptural and utilitarian uses of clay. The student will also be introduced to a variety of glazing and firing techniques. 

Continuation of Arts 1310 with an emphasis placed on the mastery of forming, surfacing, and firing processes. Intermediate hand building and wheel throwing techniques will include projects with lids, spouts and decorating. Making and formulating glazes, as well as variety of firing techniques will also be presented. Expanded critical awareness and the development of a personal aesthetic will be encouraged. There will be both self-selected and assigned projects. 

Intro to Printmaking - ARTS 1710
w/ Gary Cook
Live with reduced enrollment
Wednesdays, 9-2:30pm
Prerequisite: ARTS 1610

This course provides direct experience of exploring basic printmaking processes, including relief, intaglio, and monoprint processes, as well as the investigation of materials/media, tools, techniques, history, and concepts of printmaking. Emphasis is given to solving problems through thematic development while producing a portfolio of prints. 

Fundamental techniques in Introduction to Printmaking are presented and practiced in a survey format. Methods and expressive potentials of the major printmaking processes are taught. Instruction includes lecture, demonstrations, practice, and critique. At the conclusion of this course, the student will develop awareness of the unique properties of a wide variety of print processes and the historical development of printmaking and it’s influences on contemporary works; develop technique and the proper use of tools and materials within the print shop as a collaborative working space; Utilize a journal/sketchbook as a documentation process, to develop concepts, generate source material and aid in self-criticism and exploration; increase understanding of his/her own aesthetic aspirations and how these objectives can be expressed using the print media; and create a foundation for more advanced study of print media. 

Intro to Photography - ARTS 1410
w/ Johanna Case-Hofmeister
Online, asynchronous 

This course introduces the making of photographic images from a broad viewpoint to consider both as an art practice and as a cultural practice. The course covers basic technical information in camera use and functionality, composition, and visual design, digital workflow, editing, manipulating, and enhancing images correctly and effectively. 

 

Demonstrations, artist talks, assignments, and critiques will give students the beginning tools for creative exploration and expression in the medium of photography. Course content is created to get students thinking about the meaning of photographic images in history, culture, and in their own experiences. Students will gain the skills and knowledge to demonstrate visual voice through photography and competency in basic camera functions and composition.

 

Introduction to Photoshop - DMA 165
w/ Johanna Case-Hofmeister
Online, asynchronous 

This course introduces students to computer graphics on the Macintosh computer using Adobe Photoshop. Students will create, modify, prepare, and produce a variety of digital artwork. 

 

In this course, students will learn how to use the tools in Adobe Photoshop to create new images and edit existing images. Tools used will include selections, layers, and adjustments, among other pixel editing tools. Basic composition and output will be emphasized in all projects.

Introduction to Animation - FDMA 2714
w/ Dave Mansfield
Online with synchronous Zoom hours - Wednesdays, 3-5pm

This animation course will be focused on laying the foundations of animations and sequential story telling. The course will provide an overview of techniques ranging from hand-drawn frame-by-frame animation, to object animation and pixilation. Each class will consist of a short demonstration, viewing of related works, hands-on experimentation, and critique. Weekly assignments will further student’s exploration of animation approaches and techniques.

 

The main goal of this course is to teach the principles of animation and to become familiar with the wide variety of techniques and disciplines involved while creating portfolio pieces.

Introduction to Digital Media - FDMA 1520
w/ Johanna Case-Hofmeister
Online, asynchronous 

This course is designed to provide students with a survey of the histories, innovative concepts, and creative possibilities of digital media. Additionally, students will learn fundamental skills in teamwork, storytelling, and design.

 

Students will be immersed in the development of the visual story through the study of The Cast of Visual Characters; Seven Basic Components; Space, Line, Shape, Tone, Color, Movement, and Rhythm; The Real World & the Screen World. This course dives into film history starting with the concept of movie magic and the first inventors of cinema to contemporary filmmaking. This course also focuses on diversity in storytelling introducing new perspectives and representation in filmmaking. Students will create original image sequences based on topics and themes each week.  Students will learn how to give their peers feedback to create a fun and dynamic learning environment.

Directing I - FDMA 2610
w/ Peter Walker
Live with limited enrollment. Blackboard Learn online media assignments
Thursdays, 9-11am

The language of the screen is the great art form of our time because it offers compelling entertainment and an outstanding forum for the marriage of ideas and feelings. It leaps cultural barriers and changes hearts and minds as only good art can. 

  

With the skills taught in this course you will hone your storytelling skills and learn the art of directing! We will cover highly prized skills such as; the essential elements of drama, duality and conflict, action and character development, leadership and collaborating with a team plus the seven stages of production. This course is demanding and will require multiple media assignments submitted each week. Excellent course for students wanting to learn how to direct both a story and a team. 

Digital Video Production I - FDMA 1210
w/ Peter Walker
Live with limited enrollment. Blackboard Learn online media assignmentsWednesdays, 9-11am

An introduction to digital video production. Students learn skills for improving their camera techniques, as well as lighting, sound, storytelling, post-production and distribution. 

  

In this fast-moving course, we will be studying videos, television shows, and films, particularly those covering the topics that are hot topics of the day. By studying these examples, you will learn to adjust your own approach to fit the situation rather than imitating the way things have always been done. On the technical end, we will cover the seven stages of production and make original productions each week. This is a course for students who love making things and have plenty of stories to tell. 

Capstone: Portfolio-Practicum - DMA 270
w/ Peter Walker
Live with limited enrollment. Blackboard Learn online media assignments
Wednesdays, 3-5pm

The Media Industry in New Mexico is booming! This course puts you in a position to develop a reel/portfolio of work and show how you might advance towards a media career. 

 

As the final course in the Digital Media Arts Associates Degree program, you will work on projects which highlight your skills and prepare you for a career as a media entrepreneur. This course will take place both in the studio/classroom and outside in adventurous locations where you will have the opportunity to plan and execute cinematic camera moves using sliders, stabilizers and cranes; develop, write, storyboard, film, direct and edit meaningful projects with a dynamic team; manage the post-production workflow; and produce a series of media projects for a real-life audience. 

Introduction to Film Studies - FDMA 2210
w/ Kelly Clement
Online, asynchronous 

Analysis of film as a unique art, and a survey of main trends in film history. Screenings and critical study of major films.

 

This course is designed to provide you with a foundation for future film study; to expose you to a wide range of cinematic styles and approaches; and to move you from a passive viewer to an active “reader” of film. You will learn the basic elements of cinematic language (including narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, acting, editing, and sound) and will use that knowledge to analyze the way filmmakers convey information, story, and meaning, develop style, and elicit audience response within a single scene and over the course of an entire feature film. We’ll explore the central critical approaches to the study of cinema, and examine a wide range of film styles and movements. There are no prerequisites for taking this class. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design.

Beyond Hollywood - FDMA 2195
w/ Kelly Clement
Online, asynchronous 

An introduction to cinemas outside of the Hollywood studio system with screenings of major works.

 

The goal of this class is to familiarize students with documentary history, theory, criticism, and practice. The course is designed to challenge you to develop a critical eye, and to deepen your appreciation of the many different modes of documentary film and video. We will consider the documentary as an art form, a cultural artifact, a vehicle for political expression and social change, and as a means for representing cultures. Through weekly screenings we will explore a wide variety of films that will survey the range of documentary expression, from the classics, to the new independent and experimental forms, and everything in-between. There are no prerequisites for taking this class.

Introduction to Art - ARTH 1120
w/ Paula King
Online, asynchronous 

This foundation course introduces and explores the visual arts on a personal, societal, cultural, and historical level. An excellent course for someone new to the study of art or the experienced artist, students learn about all art-making processes, art materials, and techniques used by artists, designers, and architects. Studies feature iconic artists throughout history and major art movements. Students will build on a broad knowledge base to practice the skill of formal analysis, in order to expand an art appreciation and grow a personal aesthetic. The course offers a creative project using basic photography.

 

Blackboard Learn Online Course. This course is completed 100% online, therefore access to a computer and the internet are required. Designed with Quality Matters Standards, ARTH 1120 provides an excellent learning experience and offers flexibility for busy students. Support with the technology of the course is provided on campus, by email, and by phone by the HELP support staff of UNM. Pacing may be accelerated for early completion.

 

Inclusive Access for this course: This course has been set up for inclusive access delivery, this means your materials will be accessible through UNM Learn when classes begin. You do not need to shop for the ‘title of the book’ ahead of time. You do not need to pay by credit card or any other method, you should not see a prompt for payment at all when using the inclusive access materials. Your specially discounted price will be billed to your UNM Bursar Account AFTER the add/drop deadline. Additionally, McGraw-Hill Connect Access will be required (includes ebook, Smartbook, course learning activities, and exams).

Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design

Art History II - ARTH 2120
w/ Paula King
Online, asynchronous 

This survey course will explore architecture, sculpture, ceramics, paintings, drawings, and art objects from the 14th century to the Modern era. While focused primarily on the art of the Western civilizations, this course will also provide insights into the works of other major cultures in order to provide alternate views of art and history. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual, and cultural movements that affect and are affected by their creation and development. The course offers a creative project.

 

Blackboard Learn Online Course. This course is completed 100% online; access to a computer and the internet are required. Designed with Quality Matters Standards, ARTH 2120 provides an excellent learning experience and offers flexibility to Learners. Support with the technology of the course is provided on campus, by email, and by phone by the HELP support staff of UNM. Pacing may be accelerated for early completion.

 

Inclusive Access for this course: This course has been set up for inclusive access delivery, this means your materials will be accessible through UNM Learn when classes begin. You do not need to shop for the ‘title of the book’ ahead of time. You do not need to pay by credit card or any other method, you should not see a prompt for payment at all when using the inclusive access materials. Your specially discounted price will be billed to your UNM Bursar Account AFTER the add/drop deadline.

 

Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 7: Arts and Design (Core)